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Association of United Ukrainian Canadians

AUUC

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The Association of United Ukrainian Canadians (AUUC) endorses cease fire call

Nov 11, 2023


The AUUC has always supported the Palestinian people against their imprisonment through occupation and the denial of their right to a Palestinian state. Canada must act decisively for a ceasfire as the people of Gaza face war and the denial of food, water, electricity, fuel, medical supplies and other essential items. Canada must also act to permantly end the blockade of Gaza.


Ceasefire now, end the siege, for a just and lasting peace

Issued on Saturday, October 21, 2023
Fill out the form here to join the coalition and
endorse the November 12th pan-Canadian day of action.

People in Canada are watching in horror as the violence in Israel-Palestine has escalated towards an all-out war.

On Tuesday, the bombing of the Anglican Al-Ahli Hospital in Gaza City killed hundreds of people, most of them children. Over 5,000 people had been sheltering inside. This is an atrocity.

Since October 7, thousands have been killed following Hamas’ attack and the Israeli government’s response.

We unequivocally condemn the targeting of innocent Palestinian and Israeli civilians.

We unequivocally condemn the targeting of innocent Palestinian and Israeli civilians.

As representatives of leading pan-Canadian labour, faith, Arab, Jewish, and civil society organizations, we are calling on the Government of Canada to take these steps:

• Call for an immediate ceasefire in Israel-Palestine
• Call for an end to the blockade of Gaza and for the restoration of humanitarian aid and access to the basic necessities of life

We endorse the Canadian government’s call for humanitarian aid to Gaza and the safe return of hostages. These demands cannot be meaningfully addressed without an immediate ceasefire and while Israel's blockade of Gaza continues.

Gaza is facing a “complete siege” as food, water, electricity, and fuel have been cut off. Gaza’s last functioning seawater desalination plant shut down on Sunday after running out of fuel. Water and sanitation services have collapsed in the wake of widespread bombing.

UN shelters have also run out of water and hospital workers are warning that thousands more civilians could die if access to water, fuel, and medicine is not restored.

The already dire humanitarian crisis is rapidly deteriorating.

The Israeli government’s order to a million Gazans to evacuate to the south–an impossible feat in 24 hours–suggests that a ground war and intensifying bombing are imminent.

Our most urgent task is preventing the further loss of life and an even greater humanitarian disaster than what we have already witnessed in Gaza. An all-out war would bring catastrophe to the entire region.

As hostilities escalate, they are fuelling a rise of Anti-Arab and anti-Palestinian racism, Islamophobia, and antisemitism in Canada–which we also unequivocally condemn.

Beyond these immediate steps, the world must support efforts for a just and lasting peace in Israel-Palestine and address the root cause of the violence: Israel’s decades-long occupation of Palestinian territory.

Palestinians, Israelis, and all people in the region deserve to live in peace and security and with justice for all.




The Association of United Ukrainian Canadians (AUUC), an organization that stands for peace, continues to condemn Russia's actions

Sept 21, 2023


Letterhead

Issued September 21, 2023


The Association of United Ukrainian Canadians (AUUC), an organization that stands for peace, continues to condemn Russia's actions in regards to the invasion of Ukraine and the violation of sovereign territory.


Furthermore, the AUUC opposes the use of force, including those of global powers (the U.S., U.K., etc.) which promotes or escalates the violent conflict that has decimated the peace-loving people of Ukraine.


The AUUC calls for an immediate end to aggression and war in Ukraine and calls on the Canadian government to work for a meaningful and lasting peace in Ukraine. An immediate de-escalation of war is not enough — there must be honest, sincere efforts to reach lasting common ground to end and reverse the economic, emotional and physical damage.


Adopted by the National Committee of the Association of the United Ukrainian Canadians September 9, 2023


Read or download as a pdf







Statement of the AUUC on the war in Ukraine

Sept 21, 2023


Letterhead

Issued September 21, 2023


As the war between Ukraine and Russia increasingly turns into the extermination of each other's peoples and economies, it's increasingly likely that the outcome will be the economic regression of both countries. At the same time, this conflict has a global impact. The loss of fertilizers, wheat, pork, and fuel threatens hunger in the most economically under-developed countries and economic recession in developed countries.


Moreover, recent press reports and statements by high-ranking politicians and military officers have shifted the public discourse away from the pursuit of an immediate ceasefire, and towards moral preparation for an inevitable global conflict.


The AUUC is strongly convinced that Canada must make all possible efforts to help avoid such an inhumane and disastrous outcome.


It is unlikely that either Ukraine or Russia will be able to get a decisive victory in this war, which has already cost hundreds of thousands of lives. Therefore, both sides must look for compromise. Given this, we call on the Government of Canada, through the United Nations General Assembly, to take the initiative to seek a compromise that is viable and acceptable to both sides.


Such a compromise can be achieved by the creation of another independent Ukrainian state on the territories currently under Russian control. We call for the creation of a demilitarized zone between the two Ukrainian countries to be operated and monitored by UN Peacekeepers. Furthermore, we call for the removal of all foreign military presence in both Ukrainian countries, and that both be subject to armament limitations and inspections.


We believe this proposal can be acceptable to Russia because this new state would not be under control of the current Ukrainian government and NATO's missiles will not be installed there. It can also be acceptable to Ukraine because the new territory will still be a Ukrainian country, and its freedom and independence can be maintained.



Adopted by the National Committee of the Association of the United Ukrainian Canadians September 9, 2023


Read or download as a pdf







Resolution concerning the war in Ukraine
(as amended at the National Committee meeting of January 28 and 29, 2003)

January 28 and 29, 2023




Letterhead

Issued September 21, 2023


Resolution concerning the war in Ukraine (as amended at the National Committee meeting of January 28 and 29, 2003)


Whereas the war in Ukraine which has been going on for over 6 months has killed thousands of people and uprooted and displaced many more,


Whereas this war which has destroyed cities and cultural monuments, is exacerbating the environmental (climate) crisis, is fueling a global energy and food crisis and has the potential of precipitating a nuclear disaster,


Whereas the roots of this war in Ukraine today are complex and go back many years and will not be settled militarily,


Be it resolved that to prevent further death and destruction in Ukraine, the AUUC calls on the Canadian government to actively push for a comprehensive cease fire in the region and a negotiated peace settlement between Ukraine and Russia,


Be it further resolved that Canada strives for disarmament in Europe and all over the world,


Be it further resolved that the AUUC calls on the Canadian government to:


a) call on NATO and its Western allies to cease its expansion in Europe


b) help secure the withdrawal of Russian troops from Ukraine


c) support Ukraine's commitment to international neutrality (and a binding referendum on the future of the Donbas region}


d) commit to renewed diplomacy with Russia



Adopted by the National Committee of the Association of the United Ukrainian Canadians September 9, 2023


Read or download as a pdf







Statement of the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians on the continuing escalation of the war in Ukraine and the prospect for peace

April 5, 2023





Letterhead

Issued September 21, 2023


Statement of the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians on the continuing escalation of the war in Ukraine and the prospect for peace April 5, 2023


The National Committee of the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians, at its meeting of January 29, 2023, discussed the Russia - Ukraine war. It affirmed its position that the urgent need is to de-escalate the conflict as the means to enable a ceasefire and peace negotiations between Ukraine and Russia.


The National Committee deliberated on and passed the resolution of the Ottawa Branch of the AUUC first presented to the AUUC National Convention in October 2022 and referred to the first meeting of the National Committee for decision and action.


No matter how one characterizes the war, the imperative is to end it. More than twelve months of conflict and the destruction and death it has caused speak to this necessity.


This is critical for the peace, security and for the future of Ukraine; and to end the dangers posed by escalation to peace and security in Europe and the world.


To end the war is not the goal of all. Western nations, the ‘collective west’ as it is sometimes called, and others, look to prolong the war for their own ends. Thus, April 2022 saw the collapse of peace negotiations between Ukraine and Russia. The collapse of peace talks was welcomed by some who claim that the war must proceed in order to create conditions for peace by defeating Russia on Ukrainian battlefields. More than one year of escalating war has proven this false. The attainment of peace is no closer due the massive influx of military support to Ukraine.


The destruction of the war


The Russian – Ukraine war has brought massive destruction to the infrastructure of Ukraine and more generally to its population in the cities, towns and countryside. The Ukraine economy has been disrupted and severally damaged which further exacerbates the social and food security problems for its people. The war has severely disrupted agricultural production in Ukraine. It is estimated that agricultural production in grain and corn yields will drop 40% this year even if fighting were to stop immediately. The industrial heartland of Ukraine has borne the brunt of the conflict.


The war has impacted the global economy through soaring prices for energy and food and a breakdown of international bodies such as the G20.


What has the AUUC called for


Before the Russian invasion of February 24, 2022, the AUUC called for de-escalation and diplomacy to reduce the military tensions that were rising between Ukraine and Russia as a result of the conflict in east Ukraine. The AUUC’s position was that war could be averted


The tensions were primarily fueled by the civil war in the Donbas. Long simmering tensions between Russia and the United States over security issues such as the expansion of NATO were a contributing factor. Reducing tensions, settling the crisis in the Donbas would have been in the interest of Ukraine. It would have provided Ukraine with immense international leverage against any continued Russian threat of military action. It would have provided Ukraine with stability to pursue internal economic, social and political reforms, not the least of which was Zelensky’s promise to end to corruption and cronyism.



The position of the AUUC was not unique to it. In the period January/February 2022 the call for de-escalation and diplomacy was heard around the world as tensions mounted. Most significantly this was the desire of the people of Ukraine.


The tensions were primarily fueled by the civil war in the Donbas. Long simmering tensions between Russia and the United States over security issues such as the expansion of NATO were a contributing factor. Reducing tensions, settling the crisis in the Donbas would have been in the interest of Ukraine. It would have provided Ukraine with immense international leverage against any continued Russian threat of military action. It would have provided Ukraine with stability to pursue internal economic, social and political reforms, not the least of which was Zelensky’s promise to end to corruption and cronyism.


President Zelensky was elected on a platform of peace and stability in Ukraine with the promise to end the civil war in the Donbas. However, he was opposed in this by political forces in Ukraine which constituted themselves as the ‘Non Capitulation Movement’ and organized in the streets against settlement of the civil war on the basis of the Minsk Agreements.


The call for diplomacy and conflict resolution took a back seat to calls for confrontation and war. The Canadian government beat the drums for confrontation with Russia using Ukraine as the proxy. Sections of the Ukrainian diaspora supported this with vigor.

When wider war broke out on February 24 the AUUC called for ceasefire and negotiations to end the war. The AUUC maintains this is the only the way to end the conflict on terms that will be a cceptable to Ukraine.


The roots of the war


In Kyiv, in late 2013, mass protests began against the government headed by Viktor Yanukovych. In February 2014, following violent clashes in Kyiv, the government of President Yanukovych was replaced with an interim government. The removal of Yanukovych caused a rupture in Ukraine society along political, social, ethnic and regional lines and immediately triggered events that would lead to internal war. The regions of Donetsk and Luhansk rejected the interim government as representing a coup and “assumed responsibility for safeguarding the constitutional order, legality, citizens’ rights, and their security on our territories.” In Crimea, an autonomous republic with significant independence recognized by the Ukraine constitution, a similar break with the central government occurred.


The Ukraine army was dispatched to Donetsk and Luhansk in what was termed an anti-terrorist operation. The civil war that followed was a profound tragedy for Ukraine. It resulted in more than 14,000 dead and more than 1 million people displaced into other regions of Ukraine or to Russia. There were shortages of food and destruction of civilian structures such as homes, schools, hospitals, civic buildings and churches. There were many reasons for that conflict and it is not the scope of this statement to speak to those.



There was, however, a diplomatic solution to end the war in the Donbas and, had it been realized, then the current war would have been averted. That solution rested in the Minsk Agreements jointly signed by Ukraine and the representatives of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions (Donbas). France, Germany and Russia were the guarantors of the terms of the Minsk Agreements tasked with ensuring the parties would act in good faith. The Minsk Agreements were supported internationally and were officially adopted, unanimously, by the United Nations Security Council.

https://press.un.org/en/2015/sc11785.doc.htm

Escalation of the War


The urgent requirement is for a ceasefire and negotiations not the false premise that more war will bring peace.


Jens Stoltenberg, the head of North Atlantic Treaty Organization, speaking to the Conference of the Norwegian Confederation of Enterprises on January 5, 2023 said: “Weapons are – in fact – the way to peace”.

https://www.nato.int/cps/en/natohq/news_210447.htm?selectedLocale=en#:~:text=NATO%20Secretary%20General%20Jens%20Stoltenberg,to%20peace%E2%80%9D%2C%20said%20Mr

This position of continuing and escalating the war is widespread amongst western countries. It is the foundation of Canada’s Ukraine policy at this time. Canada and the majority of NATO countries have responded with over $60 billion in military assistance to Ukraine. At over $1.5 billion in military assistance Canada is the fifth largest contributor – a ranking that places it ahead of most European Union countries

https://www.statista.com/chart/27278/military-aid-to-ukraine-by-country/htm

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/heres-everything-canada-has-sent-to-ukraine-since-russia-invaded

On the first anniversary of the February 24 invasion by Russia Canada increased its commitments to military support as opposed to finding a path to negotiations and peace. The head of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress endorsed the Canadian government’s position a move which is keeping with the UCC’s position on the war in Ukraine and how to end it.


While the Canadian government, NATO, the U.S., the European Union and a section of the Ukrainian community in Canada and internationally see continuation of the war as the preferred option, it is one that is pursued on the backs of the Ukrainian people and the future of Ukraine. The developing situation in Ukraine is reminiscent of the destruction of Yugoslavia in a war that bears striking parallels to the conflict in Ukraine.

The prospect for peace


In the first weeks of the war Turkey spearheaded efforts to bring Ukraine and Russia to a ceasefire and peace negotiations. In April 2022 it is now widely acknowledged that peace negotiations between Russia and Ukraine were scuttled by Western powers.

https://news.cgtn.com/news/2023-02-06/Israeli-ex-PM-says-the-West-interrupted-Russia-Ukraine-peace-talks-1hcUB6GDDXO/index.html

The failure to broker peace in April 2022 resulted in 11 months of war, and in fact, escalating war. Each action by NATO countries to provide more military support has been met with a response by Russia to expand its military action. Each action and counter action has resulted in greater devastation for Ukraine and greater loss of life.


Now there are new initiatives internationally. On February 24, the one-year anniversary of the start of this conflict, China issued a 12-point peace plan.

https://news.antiwar.com/2023/02/26/china-releases-12-point-peace-for-ukraine/


Brazil is also preparing a peace initiative.

https://efolket.eu/kosmopolitiskt/2-3-lula-moves-forward-with-his-ukraine-peace-proposal/htm

Canada, however, remains dismissive of actionable peace initiatives. Foreign Minister Joly stated China’s initiative was not genuine and before peace negotiations can be considered Ukraine must shape the battlefield suitable to its interests. It should be of great concern to all Canadians that the Canadian government is not supportive of the peace process that is developing internationally.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-joly-support-ukraine-peace-talks-1.6760987


Adopted by the National Committee of the Association of the United Ukrainian Canadians September 9, 2023


Read or download as a pdf












AUUC Statement on the 50th anniversary of Chilean coup

Sept 11, 2023




A Pillar of the Ukrainian-Canadian Community Dies at 93

April 22, 1930 – July 25, 2023

Myron Shatulsky passed away recently after a life time of cultural activism and commitment to his Ukrainian heritage. He will be remembered as someone deeply embedded in the service to others and resistance to oppression. While he engaged his Ukrainian- Canadian community in many ways, it was his love of music and song that conveyed his passion so poignantly.

Myron was born in the old Grace Hospital and grew up in the fabled North End of Winnipeg. He attended King Edward School, Faraday School and later, Isaac Newton High School. He studied drafting and machine design at the Manitoba Technical Institute.

THe took violin lessons at the Bornoff School of music. Later he participated in the String Orchestra at the Ukrainian Labour Temple (ULT) and was a member of the Isaac Newton High School Student Orchestra.

In 1950, he received a scholarship from the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians (AUUC) to study in Kyiv, Ukraine. After completing three years of studies at the Conservatory of Music and Choreographic Institute in 1950 he returned to Winnipeg. There he worked as a choir and orchestra conductor and folk-dance instructor. In 1967 he worked for a short time as a machine design draftsman for Winnipeg Motor Coach Industries.


When he and Olga moved to Toronto in 1968 he worked for Stanley A. Grant designing crests. There he became an associate conductor of the Shevchenko Male Chorus and Toronto Mandolin Orchestra. In 1970 this group made a successful concert tour of Ukraine.

In 1972 Myron and Olga moved to Vancouver - Coquitlam where Myron worked for Morgan Power Operations. During his time he wrote the book “The Ukrainian Folk Dance,” published in 1980. Myron's book was highly significant to the development of Ukrainian dance in Canada and his work “Canada Suite” incorporated elements of traditional First Nations dance.

In the summer of 1984, Myron and Olga moved back to Winnipeg and in 1993 Myron took over the conducting of the Winnipeg String Orchestra. He also organized a mandolin quintet playing the Mandola. After ten years the quintet held its final concert in 2004. Here he carried on the legacy of his father who was instrumental in starting the AUUC in the 1920’s.

Dr. Nolan Reilly remembers Myron and reflects on his impact on the recorded history of the Labour Temple and the AUUC. “I spend many hours fascinated by his story telling and I loved taking friends from all over to the ULT to meet him.

“I was thinking of my many hours in the hall with Myron when I spoke at the re-opening of the hall several years ago. My emotions were such I had a very difficult time speaking. It was so very sad knowing my vibrant, talented, and caring friend was slipping away and couldn't join us that day. The world was out of order. I should have been introducing Myron, as I had done many times before, to speak of the history of the hall and community that he loved deeply.”

He also was instrumental in establishing the Canadian Society for Ukrainian Labour Research and the Ukrainian Labour Temple Foundation.


His wife of 67 years, Olga and nephew Rudi were by his side at Fred Douglas Lodge, Evergreen when he passed away quietly. He leaves behind, his sister-inlaws, Mary Semanowich, Lucy Nykolyshyn and their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.


Read Myron’s Obituary at Cropo Funeral Chapel


Read Myron’s Obituary at Winnipeg Free Press


______________________________________________________

Glenn Michalchuk AUUC National President
Op-ed published in NiagaraThisWeek.com

Achieving peace is going to require Ukraine and Russia to talk

Thursday, March 16, 2023

As National President of the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians, I have spoken many times on what Canada’s response to the war should be. The most recent instance was to St. Catharines City Council regarding a motion equating support for Ukraine with military support.

The motion and discussion that ensued reinforced what underscores the motivation for the conflict and why the prospect of peace is so difficult.

The motivation is Cold War ideology. It exists both in Ukraine and in Western countries, who now pump weapons into the country. It also exists among a section of the Ukrainian diaspora, who see the war as the means to settle accounts with Ukraine’s history within the Soviet Union.

That is why the notion of resolving this conflict has become synonymous with pursuing war and pouring in weapons. Disinformation, coupled with denial of the facts underlying this war, are the means to justify why Ukraine is at war with Russia. Thus, Canada and NATO must not relent in supporting Ukraine to some “ultimate” conclusion. This is why Canadians are told that peace will come through the defeat of Russia — our enemy from the Cold War.


This is very dangerous. The incontestable facts are that this war has steadily escalated since a possible peace agreement in April 2022 was scuttled. With escalation has come the danger of direct confrontation between NATO and Russia. A conflict between NATO and Russia involves the U.S., and it potentially involves nuclear weapons. We have already seen in this conflict that nuclear facilities are not taboo as a target. They have been repeatedly shelled.

As the war has escalated, so have the stakes. Russia has warned that it views NATO’s pushing of weapons into Ukraine as a direct threat to its existence.

We (Canada) can either see ending this war as a “fight to the finish” — whatever that means — or we can join with the majority of world’s nations who are working to de-escalate the conflict, secure a ceasefire and bring Russia and Ukraine to peace negotiations. The latter is the only sane response.

And what of the people of Ukraine? Leaders speak in their name when calling for more weapons. The people of Ukraine want peace. Zelenskyy was elected to bring peace to Ukraine by ending the civil war. He was stopped from doing this by the ultranationalists and the non-capitulation movement. We should not forget — while all regions of Ukraine have been impacted by this war — it is the people of the Donbas who have lived through most of this fighting and an eight-year civil war with the central government that began in 2014.

Achieving peace is going to require Ukraine and Russia to talk. Both have kept their word on prisoner exchanges and restoring grain shipments; they can trust each other for further agreements, too. Countries that have remained neutral in the conflict will be important to the negotiations.

Achieving peace is going to require Ukraine and Russia to talk. Both have kept their word on prisoner exchanges and restoring grain shipments; they can trust each other for further agreements, too. Countries that have remained neutral in the conflict will be important to the negotiations.


______________________________________________________

Glenn Michalchuk AUUC National President
Speaks to the St. Catharines City Council

St. Catharines city council urges federal government to continue supporting Ukraine ‘militarily’ until end of war

Feb 27, 2023

On February 27, 2023 AUUC National President Glenn Michalchuk told council peace and diplomacy have been “distinctly lacking” in the Canadian government’s response to the war.
“Canada must emphasize the need to bring peace to Ukraine and act accordingly. The strategy of more weapons to support more war has been a failure,” he said.



Read Glenn's full presentation



______________________________________________________




No to War, No to NATO:
North American perspectives on Ukraine, Russia, and NATO!

No to War, No to NATO!

Feb 23, 2023

On February 23, 2023 AUUC National President Glenn Michalchuk was a panelist on a webinar entitled: “No to War, No to NATO: North American perspectives on Ukraine, Russia and NATO” hosted by World Beyond War (Canada)
For the last year, the war in Ukraine has been reflected daily in mainstream news, but remains an issue clouded by confusion. While events of the last year are front page news, there is little talk about the many years of NATO provocations, aggression and military buildup against Russia. More and more each day, NATO countries including Canada, the US, and England are fueling the war, funneling even more weapons into Ukraine. The Canada-Wide Peace and Justice Network hosted a webinar featuring speakers from Canada, the US, and Ukraine.



Join the conversation with:


Glenn Michalchuk: President of the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians and Chair of Peace Alliance Winnipeg.

Read Glenn's full presentation


Margaret Kimberly: Executive Editor of Black Agenda Report and author of the book Prejudential: Black America and the Presidents. In addition to being a Coordinating Committee member of Black Alliance for Peace, she is an Administrative Committee member of the United National Antiwar Coalition, and the Board of Directors of the U.S. Peace Memorial Foundation. She is also a board member of Consortium News and the editorial board of the International Manifesto Group.

Kevin MacKay: Kevin is a professor at Mohawk College in Hamilton. He researches, writes, and teaches on the subjects of civilization collapse, political transformation, and global systemic risk. In 2017 he published Radical Transformation: Oligarchy, Collapse, and the Crisis of Civilization with Between the Lines Books. He is currently working on a book entitled A New Ecological Politics, with Oregon State University Press. Kevin also serves as Vice President of the Mohawk faculty union, OPSEU Local 240.

Co-moderated by Janine Solanki and Brendan Stone Janine is a Vancouver-based activist and organizer with Mobilization Against War & Occupation (MAWO), a member group of the Canada-Wide Peace & Justice Network. Brendan is the co-chair of the Hamilton Coalition to Stop the War, and the co-host of the Unusual Sources radio program. As digital manager for the Taylor Report radio program, Brendan has been distributing interviews warning about the danger of NATO's role in Ukraine since 2014, and has written on the subject. Brendan is involved with the series of anti-war events happening in February and March, and you can find out more at hcsw.ca



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Russo-Ukrainian Crisis

2021–2022 Russo-Ukrainian Crisis


2021-2022 Russo-Ukrainian Crisis

Association of United Ukrainian Canadians Statement on the Situation in Ukraine

Released by our National Office on February 26, 2022


The Association of United Ukrainian Canadians, representing Ukrainian-Canadians of many generations with ties to family and friends in Ukraine, is deeply concerned about the crisis in Ukraine.


We call upon the international community to bring about a comprehensive ceasefire between the Governments of Ukraine and Russia. A ceasefire is the immediate necessity to end the bloodshed, destruction, displacement and fear that has been put upon the people of Ukraine.


War is the basest form of political contention. It is a breakdown of the fraternal unity of peoples. The AUUC calls for the international community to pressure Russia to accept Ukraine's call for a ceasefire and negotiations to restore peace and stability to Ukraine, to Europe and the world.


It is the common good and will of humanity that can end this conflict.


Peace for Ukraine!


Peace for Europe!


Peace for the World!




National Media Contacts:


Glenn Michalchuk 204-479-7026
National Vice-President


Robert Seychuk 613-791-5983
National President

.